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Adult Development Lab

 

Human Development

Department of Human Ecology

University of California, Davis

One Shields Avenue

Davis, CA 95616

530-752-6968

 


The Adult Development Lab is located at TB116, next to the Center for Child and Family Studies (CCFS) small logo

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Knowledge is an important component of cognitive functioning and its role is becoming increasingly acknowledged in theoretical work on cognitive science and intelligence. In the Adult Development Lab, we explore the role of prior knowledge in how adults learn, comprehend information, and make adaptive decisions. We also examine how the relationships between knowledge and cognitive functioning change across the adult lifespan. Knowledge is of particular interest to those who study cognition and aging because knowledge stores, unlike some cognitive abilities, are maintained with increasing age. We are interested in understanding the mechanisms that enable older adults to use knowledge to avoid declines in age-sensitive areas of cognitive functioning. One of the areas in which we examine these dynamics is health literacy, defined as the ability to obtain, comprehend, and use health information to make informed choices.

Lisa M. Soederberg Miller, Ph.D., the Director of the Adult Development Lab, is an Associate Professor in the Department of Human Ecology. She and Tanja Gibson, the Lab Manager, collaborate with faculty, undergraduate, and graduate students from Human Development, Psychology, Education, and Nutrition. We receive funding from the National Institutes of Health.

Prospective Graduate Students: Although Dr Miller is affiliated with Psychology and Education, you should apply directly to the Human Development Graduate Group (as well as to other doctoral programs in which you may have interest) by the priority deadline to receive full funding considerations. Please contact Dr. Miller if you are interested in learning more about the HDGG doctoral program. http://humandevelopment.ucdavis.edu/phd.php

 

   
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